Category Archives: On Russia

Neighbourhood Cam: Sunday Evening

As I grow older, I cherish Sundays more and more – especially this year when I finally don’t work on Sundays. I’m discovering the beauty of “taking time”: I don’t rush my breakfast, dog-walking, reading, doing something about the house, if I must. The feeling of prolonged time is so palpable on Sunday, yet there is also this special silence and relaxedness that is so characteristic of the fin de weekend. Whereas before I’d be thinking of what else to do for the next day, this time, this October, I’m just looking forward to the dog-walking and evening tea.

Over the years I’ve done so much and gone so far that I can’t help taking time and looking inside rather than collecting the impressions of the outer world. My religious views also suggest the inner work, the improvement of the inner vision and wisdom, and I am glad this is so. The year 2014 was a turning point in my religious outlook, and I’m glad to be among the faithful. I’ve never been an atheist, but the years of agnosticism or misconception of the role of the church are also firmly in the past.

Hence tonight, as I’m looking out of my window, I feel this immense warm gratitude to each and every person on my path that, knowingly or not, made me who I am now. As the city is sinking into the dusk, I’m catching the last glimpses of Sunday – to imbue the coming week with calm and joy.

Neighbourhood Cam: Mid-September Sunset

It may seem I live from sunset to sunset – so many of them have I captured in the last few years since I was back to Moscow. Each of them is truly spectacular. Occasionally, I think that I could move to the countryside, but one thing that would influence my decision is the opportunity to watch sunsets.

I worked with a guy whose parents lived in a house halfway between Cambridge and Chichester. From the front it was just another country house, but the back door led from the kitchen into the yard that overlooked the beautiful expanse of either rapeseed or rye framed on the horizon by the woods’ greenery and the azure sky. We visited his parents in the evening, it was summer, the sun was setting slowly, and the sky was lazily donning the darker blues, adding a tint of feminine pinks to its subdued countryside glamour.

So, if that could be the view from my backyard that I would get upon moving to the country, I probably wouldn’t give it a second thought. Meanwhile, I continue enjoying the captivating sunsets from my block of flats.

Neighbourhood Cam: Morning Flowers

I took this photo a couple of years ago during my morning walk. The bed of tulips caught the rising sun, creating a beautiful tapestry of subdued shades. This year the tulips season went almost unnoticed due to the lockdown, and the flowerbeds presently boast different kind of smaller garden flowers.

In my neighbourhood there are a lot of apple and pear trees, as well as cherries. The latter have already been eaten by kids and birds. But the apples and pears are ripe, and where they grow, the ground is covered with fallen fruit.

August is my second most favourite month, after December.

Post-LockDown Thoughts: Distant Education – 1

distant-education
DIstant education has become widely accepted (if reluctantly) during lockdown of 2020 (Image credit: zazaschool.com)

There are rumours that another lockdown is looming from mid-September onwards. Hence I thought it was high time to reflect on the first episode of our not-so-lovely soap opera. First, let me share some musings on distant education we’ve been through.

Speaking as a tutor, I have to say that I’m rather thankful to lockdown. On the one hand, it was a bit of a hassle to sort out the weekly schedule for my students. Up until May we all presumed that there would be Year 9 exams, analogous to the GCSEs in England. In May the Ministry of Education resolutely said ‘no’ to GCSEs and rescheduled A Levels to June. In case with private tutors it meant that we kept working all through May, June and even July. My personal vacations began on August, 2. To say that I’m tired is to say nothing. It looks and feels that I’d better stay in the city to avoid possible complications, but I certainly feel I have to go somewhere to get some rest.

On the other hand, I realised just how convenient my work suddenly became. I no longer had to visit students, neither they had to come to me, and yet we had quality lessons over the phone or Zoom. If I wanted, I could easily make myself a cup of tea or coffee, something I don’t practise when I work face-to-face. Most importantly, we were able to do so much more in a relatively short time. I felt that my secondary school students began to feel more confident.

Children, too, had more time on their hands to do something creative. In the next post on the topic I’ll show the animated plasticine videos one of my students created at home. Other students took to drawing, sewing, reading, and just enjoying themselves.

I’m not sure I want things to stay this way. The classroom experience means a lot to both students and teachers, so it is important that we all the chance to learn and teach face-to-face. However, I must admit, now relying on my own experience, that distant education is a good opportunity that should not be discarded.

To be continued…

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Neighbourhood Cam: The Peachy Sunset

As we often say, posting a picture taken by phone: “it doesn’t reflect the true colours”. The sun is setting at this precise moment in Moscow, and the beautiful peachy pastel shades have painted the sky.

I’ve had a very good day, if judged by 3 cones of ice cream that I ate. I wrote and read a lot, and now is the time to slow down and get ready for the night.

Other posts in Neighbourhood Cam.

Neighbourhood Cam: Sunday Sunset

There’s little better than to spend a Sunday afternoon in a company of good friends. Years ago I wondered what to do to ensure I spend such lovely time with people whose company I treasure. It took me a decade to find such people but now I’m very happy to have them. So, this Sunday sunset is peaceful and fills my heart with joy.

My school year has finally ended, the A-Levels are done with, and my students are looking forward to their results – and their new adult life. I wish them every happiness on their way.

These days in Russia we recall the 1980 Olympics. I’m doing two voiceover projects, in one of them I’m also a translator, and my text will apparently be used by the German team to produce a German version of an educational course. The French voiceover project involves me as an editor and a voiceover artist; this is a Psychology course for those who wish to overcome stress.

I’ve got enough time now to finish my editorial work, to develop my Yandex.Zen channel, and to do a couple of translation projects. I’ll probably finish a couple of knitting projects, too.

And to share the glimpses of my Moscow life with you, I’ve started the rubric Neighbourhood Cam. My Instagram account is also dedicated to the photos of the place where I was born and currently live. To begin with, here’s today’s Sunday sunset.

Also, if there’s something you want to learn about life in Russia, or Moscow in particular, feel free to ask!

More posts in Neighbourhood Cam.

QR-codes in Moscow Are Introduced

We’re in the new week of quarantine, and QR-codes in Moscow are now necessary to obtain if you need to go to work. Officially, this is due to the Muscovites’ below-average observation of quarantine. Indeed, a lot of people, especially youngsters, still go out, so now they will have to order QR-codes in Moscow that will then track their movement and whereabouts.

As for me, I’m in yet another week of distant teaching. There are many advantages, and perhaps my dogs appreciate the sudden absence of people more than I do. The biggest disadvantage is the need to operate multiple devices. In the past, if we used a textbook, then I didn’t need either phone or the Internet. Today, I often use both a textbook and the Internet, and I conduct a session via a phone.

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Quarantine Shuts Moscow Down

As of March 30th nobody can leave the house in Moscow, unless a matter of urgency. Quarantine shuts Moscow down. Dental services have stopped working for a week, just as shopping malls, entertainment centres, cultural places and restaurants and cafés of sorts. People are advised not to walk in parks, therefore all major parks have been shut down. Only shops, pet shops, pharmacies, clinics, and municipal and state services remain operational.

Needless to say, this will cause a lot of damage to businesses; however, it will also reveal just to what extent these businesses are responsible and ethical. It’s one thing to report the growing profits but a totally different thing to consider the liabilities and a force major. It’s one thing to boast a team of people and another thing to avoid lay-offs at the time of an economic crisis. Quarantine shuts Moscow down for us to reassess our ways in life and business.

The future will show what Russian businesses can withstand this frightening check on their skills. In the meantime, we’re all bracing up to a week off work… that may be extended, for all we know. I went shopping yesterday, so I’m going to stay at home mainly, except for short voyages to walk my dogs.

More posts in #safeathomeinrussia

How We’re Going Through the Pandemics

I’ve been working from home this week. It’s slightly challenging for going through, delightfully novel and surprisingly wholesome. I start work in the morning and finish any time between 4.30pm and 8pm. And I still have time for other things.

I’m a bit concerned about the attitude of some new “divines” to coronavirus. They preach this is a great, albeit scary, way to “clear the planet”. Look, they say, dolphins are coming back to Venice, isn’t this amazing?! Sure, some people die, and still more will if they are too resistant to change. Be flexible, be liquid, learn to work online, and chances are, you’ll get through alright.

The reason these preachings perplex me slightly is because there is strong evidence of a new kind of biological weapon being tested. And as much as I’m glad for both Venice and dolphins, I feel anxious as to what the future holds.

However, I agree with the sages: we need to be flexible. In the time of great changes it’s futile to try and maintain status quo, ancien régime, the way we were, you name it. I’ve just had a thought that this pandemic may hammer the nail in the EU’s coffin, perhaps penultimate yet. One of my students is going through his personal upheaval, and he’s managing it poorly, so I reason with him thus: everything that is yours will remain yours. Sadly, at time like this it is only us that remain ours; the rest may go.

I’ve been through these crises a few times already, and I’m grateful for the skills that will undoubtedly see me through. I’m grateful for my faith, my work, my talent. These are the things that will always remain mine.

I’ve just been through the posts I wrote in 2008 and 2009, and it’s wonderful to see how the above mentioned skills helped me then. Feel free to read my blog and find all the inspiration and support you need. And I’ll keep you updated on what’s happening in Russia (particularly Moscow) and how things are going for me this time.

Take care and #staysafeathomeinrussia